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Red Canadice Seedless Grape

Grapes


Comments from

Gurneys(external link)
Firm, fully ripe red grapes have a pleasant tang and no tough skins. Flavor is excellent. Produces 35-40 clusters of fruit per vine in late Aug., early Sept. Tolerates sub-zero temperatures. No. 1, 1-yr. vines. Zones 4-8.
Planting Tip: Each vine requires about 15 ft. of growing space on a wire trellis or fence with at least 8 hours of sunlight.

Zones: 4 - 8 (-20° F.)
Height: varies
Spacing: 8-15 ft
Depth: same as in the nursery
Spread: 20 ft
Sun/Shade: full sun
Pollinator: self-pollinating
Yield: 20-40 pounds
Color: White/green
Foliage: dark green
Blooms: May
Fruit: Medium size, firm, seedless red fruit, not a slip skin variety
Comments: Long, large, well-filled clusters 6-8 inches long. Fruit has a spicy flavor with outstanding quality. Keeps long on the vine; long harvest season. Medium resistance to black rot. Somewhat susceptible to mildews. Cold-hardy choice for the North. American grape. Train on arbor or trellis. Developed in the North. Best for northern climates for seedless grapes. Tends to produce some type of seed if grown in climates above zone 6.

Miller Nursery(external link)

After the worst winter in Fingerlakes memory, our Canadice vines bore great crops — they were loaded!

As this was written, we had before us a basket of grapes freshly cut from our vineyards. We picked them to compare the differences between the Canadice and other grapes. There’s Alden, big as a plum…ummm, good, but not seedless. We taste Lakemont, Interlaken, and Himrod whites. Each is firm, mild, juicy. They’re all better, we think, than the famous Thompson seedless. We taste still more grapes, until we come to Canadice. Ah, the difference! It’s on the tongue! No tough skin to interfere; the skin ADDS zest to the taste! Our taste buds awaken with the flavor. Canadice is not merely sweet. Many grapes are sweet. Canadice is so – well, grape-y. It has a hint of sauciness, or spiciness. No other grape has this flavor…words can’t describe it! The longer we watched Canadice grow during the test years, the more it impressed us. Bearing from the first year, it has given larger, finer fruit each year. Clusters 6-8 inches long. Trim. Compact. Nice shoulders. Totally seedless, medium size, firm berries that keep on the vine a long time. Ripens mid August, can be picked through Sept. Best of all for colder area growers, is its hardiness. Fully as hardy as Concord Seedless, it’s proven for fruiting after bad winters. Canadice just has everything. You can’t say enough. Ripens early. Easy to grow. Good for home or commercial growing. Zones 5-8

Michigan Bulb(external link)
Light: Full sun
Harvest: Late summer to early fall
Height: 8-10'
Size: Bareroot
Zones: 4 to 8
Restricted States: AE AK CA GU HI ID OR PR WA

If you love grapes but hate bothersome seeds, you'll love these seedless varieties. All three are sweet, juicy and easy to grow. All varieties are self-pollinating.

Product Details
Botanical Name: Vitis labrusca x 'Canadice'
Form: Deciduous woody vine
Sun Exposure: Partial Shade/Full Sun
Height/Habit: 15 -20'+ vining habit with tendrils
Spread: 2 - 3'
Spacing: 6 - 7'
Hardiness Zone: 5 - 8
Foliage Type: 6" deeply lobed and rounded, quite ornamental.
Flower Form: Small, 5 petaled, held in narrow panicles. Not ornamental.
Flower Color: White
Flowering Date: Summer
Soil Requirements: Well-drained, humus-enriched.
Growth Rate: Moderate to fast.
Unique Characteristics: A Hybrid cross of Bath x Himrod released by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva New York 1977. It was named after Canadice Lake. Flavor is said to resemble Delaware with a strong spicy taste. Excellent table grape for wine, juice or jelly. Harvest is from mid-August into October.
Pruning: Follow instructions in the planting guide.

Miller Nursery(external link)
After the worst winter in Fingerlakes memory, our Canadice vines bore great crops — they were loaded!

As this was written, we had before us a basket of grapes freshly cut from our vineyards. We picked them to compare the differences between the Canadice and other grapes. There’s Alden, big as a plum…ummm, good, but not seedless. We taste Lakemont, Interlaken, and Himrod whites. Each is firm, mild, juicy. They’re all better, we think, than the famous Thompson seedless. We taste still more grapes, until we come to Canadice. Ah, the difference! It’s on the tongue! No tough skin to interfere; the skin ADDS zest to the taste! Our taste buds awaken with the flavor. Canadice is not merely sweet. Many grapes are sweet. Canadice is so – well, grape-y. It has a hint of sauciness, or spiciness. No other grape has this flavor…words can’t describe it! The longer we watched Canadice grow during the test years, the more it impressed us. Bearing from the first year, it has given larger, finer fruit each year. Clusters 6-8 inches long. Trim. Compact. Nice shoulders. Totally seedless, medium size, firm berries that keep on the vine a long time. Ripens mid August, can be picked through Sept. Best of all for colder area growers, is its hardiness. Fully as hardy as Concord Seedless, it’s proven for fruiting after bad winters. Canadice just has everything. You can’t say enough. Ripens early. Easy to grow. Good for home or commercial growing. Zones 5-8

Nature Hills(external link)
Product Description:
The Candice Grape, Vitis 'Canadice', is a very good red seedless variety with compact fruit clusters of large berries. Candice is very vigorous with good winter hardiness. It is a woody, deciduous, tendril climbing vine which typically grows 15-20 feet long, unless pruned shorter. Ripening in early September, it is considered to be a good grape for jams, jellies and fresh eating. With its large, shallowly-three-lobed, green foliage, it has flowers that are attractive to bees and ripe fruit is attractive to some hornets and wasps. This grape tolerates a wide range of soil conditions, but must have good drainage. Grapes are primarily grown for fruit production in home fruitgardens where they provide good ornamental value: bold summer foliage, showy fruit, some fall color and shaggy, twisted trunking and branching often best seen in winter. Grapes need a good support system like fences, walls, trellises, arbors or other structures. A single grapevine produces enough new growth every year to roof an arbor, arch a walkway, or shade over a terrace or deck. The grape vines can be quite attractive year-round and can provide good cover, screening, or shade to areas around the home. Grapes need full sunlight and high temperatures to ripen, so plant on southern slopes, the south side of windbreaks, or the south sides of buildings. Birds love grapes, so be sure to plant some to share.

See Also
The Virtual Outdoorsman

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