Fruits

Trees, bushes or plants

Put melon info under Vegetables please

Sub-categories

Growing Apples

Put any ebooks about Growing Apples here...

(5 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Apricots

(0 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Aronia Melanocarpa

(0 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Autumn Olive

(0 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Blackberries

(0 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Blueberries

(0 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Cherries

(0 entries, 0 subcategories)

View

Growing Currants

(1 entry, 0 subcategories)

View

Fire Blight

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

Fire blight is a bacterial disease affecting apple, crabapple, pear, hawthorn, pyracantha (firethorn) and related species. The bacteria commonly overwinter in cankers (sunken diseased areas) on the tree, which produce a sticky exudate in early spring (Figure 1). The bac­teria are usually spread from the cankers by insects and by wind-blown rain. Careless pruning practices may also spread the bacteria.

Fruit Cultivars for Home Plantings

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

Success in growing fruits in home plantings largely depends on the type or cultivar selected. Midwestern growing conditions — cold winters; frosty or rainy springs; hot, dry summers — make it difficult to grow some of the well-known fruits. Every gardener should be realistic and discriminating about what fruits to plant. Many problems with winter injury, diseases and insects can be avoided by choosing a fruit cultivar that is well adapted to your site c…

Fruit Spray Schedules for the Homeowner

By:
WizarDave
Downloads:
0
Added:
2nd January 2017

University of Missouri Extension

Home Fruit Production: Peach and Nectarine Culture

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

The peach has often been called the Queen of Fruits. Its beauty is surpassed only by its delightful flavor and texture. Peach trees require considerable care, however, and cultivars should be carefully selected.

Nectarines are basically fuzzless peaches and are treated the same as peaches. However, they are more challenging to grow than peaches. Most nectarines have only moderate to poor resistance to bacterial spot, and nectarine trees are not as cold…

Insect Borers of Fruit Trees

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

The immature or larval stages of insects, particularly beetles and moths, that feed on wood rather than leaves or plant juices are referred to as borers. All the woody parts of the tree from the buds and twigs to the trunk and roots are susceptible to borer attack. Most borers are attracted to trees that are weakened through drought, injury or disease, but some borer species can successfully attack healthy, vigorous trees.

Once borers have infested a t…

Master Gardener Core Manual - Fruit Production

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

Missouri is home to almost all temperate zone fruit plants, including strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, gooseberries, currants, blueberries, grapes, apricots, cherries, plums, nectarines, peaches, apples and pears. They can be harvested from mid-May through the end of October (Figure 1). However, because of differences in their requirements of weather and soil and in their susceptibility to pests, some fruit plants grow better than others.

Pollinating Fruit Crops

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

Most fruit crops require pollination to ensure that fruit sets. Pollination is the transfer of grains of pollen from the anthers (male floral part) to the stigma (female floral part) of a flower (Figure 1). Pollen grains get caught on the sticky surface of the stigma, germinate and produce a tube that grows down the style and unites with the female cell in the ovary. This union is called fertilization. After fertilization occurs, seeds develop and the f…

Pruning Raspberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Currants and Elderberries

By:
MU Extension
Downloads:
0
Added:
14th January 2017

Brambles are biennial plants with two types of canes: primocanes and floricanes. For fall-fruiting raspberries and blackberries, berries are harvested in August or September from 1-year-old canes called primocanes. For summer-fruiting brambles, primocanes are 1-year-old vegetative canes, and 2-year-old canes called floricanes produce the fruit. Canes that produce fruit die after the fruit matures and will need to be pruned. Various brambles are pruned d…